THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL BOOK PDF

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Get news about Literary Fiction books, authors, and more . “Underneath the ironies, [The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel] is a book about remembering—too late, . Editorial Reviews. Review. 'Elegantly read by Nina Wadia' INDEPENDENT. About the Author The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel: A Novel (Random House Movie Tie-In Books. Audible Sample. Audible Sample. Playing Playing Loading. THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL. Written by. 01 Parker. Based on the book THESE FOOLISH THINGS by Deborah Moggach. FOX SEARCHLIGHT.


The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel Book Pdf

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the same as a solution manual you download in a book store or download off the web. Save as PDF version of the best exotic marigold hotel deborah moggach. The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Alternate Cover Edition ISBN (ISBN Screenplay-Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File . txt) or read online. Screenplay-Best_Exotic_Marigold_Hotel.

If you've seen and loved the film, do yourself a favour and leave the book alone I do wonder if the book suffered as the film was so good - a friend read it recently without having seen the film and really enjoyed it, maybe I was just expecting so much more I'm going through my fave books and posting mini-reviews of those I think others would really like.

And this is one of them, about British adult children who decide the best way to get their pesky elders out of the way is to start a retirement home in India. Very funny and an excellent statement on how no one should be underestimated because of age.

View 1 comment. Jun 04, Ailish rated it did not like it Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. I was disappointed with this book. The premise was great, however the story failed to progress and the writing was very uneven, some of it being beautiful, while much of it was needlessly vulgar and tawdry. Ravi, a competent, sensitive doctor, is slowly being ground down by the decaying British NHS and his father-in-law Norman, a dirty old man 'straight out of Benny Hill' who comes to stay with them after being thrown out of a nursing home for sexually assaulting a nurse, bringing his disgusting I was disappointed with this book.

Ravi, a competent, sensitive doctor, is slowly being ground down by the decaying British NHS and his father-in-law Norman, a dirty old man 'straight out of Benny Hill' who comes to stay with them after being thrown out of a nursing home for sexually assaulting a nurse, bringing his disgusting personal habits and taste for pornography with him.

Norman's presence is putting a serious strain on Ravi's marriage, and when Ravi meets up with an entrepreneurial Indian cousin, a new idea is hatched for a successful business and for dispatching the Aged P.

Just as so many other things are being outsourced to India, why not aged care? A retirement home in India, with cheap, plentiful labour, low costs, and sunshine, to accommodate the elderly people for whom Britain no longer has a place.

Gradually other lonely, elderly Britishers with limited budgets and sad stories sign on for the idea and make their way to Bangalore. Once there, the residents of the Best Exotic Marigold Hotel begin to make new lives for themselves. The first three of four pages were really beautiful, but after that the author provides too much detail about Norman's habits to make for pleasant reading.

The introduction to Evelyn, Muriel and Dorothy was also beautifully presented. After that, however, it was largely downhill. This book is billed as being comic, but, while it has flashes of humor, I didn't find it funny at all. What really destroyed the book for me was the author's harshly explicit references to assorted sex acts and functions that littered the novel, particularly the last third, unaccompanied by any connection with love or self-giving.

Evelyn's desperately lonely 49 year old daughter, Theresa, who has been wandering round India seeking spiritual solace and enlightenment finds 'happiness' and a new self in a two-week torrid fling with a dodgy English stranger. Admitting that no love is involved on either side, she is affirmed by being sexually desirable, by the experience of 'rapture' and by accepting that the best attitude is one of 'easy come easy go' instead of trying to form 'relationships', an attitude which has previously hampered her in the past.

Norman, whose motive for agreeing to the move to India is his belief that he will find voluptuous sensual women eager to meet his needs, spends much of the book attempting to find them, and gets his comeuppance when he has a heart attack and dies after a nasty shock in a brothel.

It seems that this is supposed to be funny.

I had hoped that having included him in the story the author would have him come to discover some sort of respect for women, or at least for himself, by the end, but he is just one continuous noxious presence that detracts from anything positive that could be said about the book.

The attitude to marriage is almost entirely negative. The marriage of Ravi and his wife teeters on the brink until the end of the book, and while it appears to be improving, there is no indication that it will last. Ravi's brother-in-law is cowed and miserable before his wife and his mother. The hotel manager is completely miserable in his marriage this again is supposed to be amusing , but his problems are resolved when his marriage breaks up.

Charles, Evelyn's son, is stuck in a miserable marriage and is despised by his spoilt children. Towards the end of the novel he gathers up the resolve to escape, remaining in India to take up with an Indian hotel-greeter, however within the month he is collected by his bossy wife and returns home. Keith, Theresa's find, has managed to lose track of his fifth wife and her children in his sudden flight from the British police for shady business dealings, and isn't remotely interested in finding her.

Jean and Douglas Ainslie are envied as the only married couple at the Hotel and they seem to have the perfect marriage. When Jean is prostrated by grief on discovering her son's homosexuality Douglas, after more than 40 years of marriage suddenly discovers that he doesn't care whether she is happy or not, and in fact doesn't like her at all and has never really loved her. At the end of the book Jean returns to England while Douglas gives Evelyn a happy ending by marrying her.

Add to that a patronising and objectifying attitude towards Indian men and women, Indian products, Indian business and industry, and ridicule of the Hindu religion. Not a good read. What I did like about this book was the initial presentation of the gentle widow Evelyn, the cockney racist Muriel, and the retired Dorothy.

Evelyn is portrayed as a kind, thoughtful person with love to lavish on the desperately poor children outside the hotel. Also enjoyable and amusing is the friendship she arranges between the young people who work at the call centre across the road with the residents of the Hotel although even that is spoilt by Norman's groping of the girls. I admired Muriel's courage, as she faces a trip to India after a lifetime of fear, ignorance and resentment of people from other racial backgrounds who have come to London, a violent mugging, the ransacking of her home, near destitution and the loss of her son.

I also admired her love for her son and her faith that he would come to look for her, and I loved the fact that Keith, in all other respects a repellent individual, really does love Muriel, worries over her and is overjoyed to find her again. These elements, however, were just not enough to make me appreciate this book. An excellent examination of the business of growing old this highly original tale centres around a retirement home set up in Bangalore with the intention of attracting British pensioners.

We are introduced to a variety of characters, from the Indian operators of the home to the incoming residents and their offspring - ranging from the unscrupulous to the exasperated - who are prepared to export their ageing parents halfway across the globe. As the new arrivals touch down on Indian soil the plot An excellent examination of the business of growing old this highly original tale centres around a retirement home set up in Bangalore with the intention of attracting British pensioners.

As the new arrivals touch down on Indian soil the plot takes a breather. At that point I fet there was no plot hook, nothing specific to force the reader to read on, beyond an interest in the characters and the way they are likely to react to eachother and their new environment.

Fortunately this is what Deborah Moggach does best - the development of fascinating characters through sharp and witty observation 'Look at that Mrs Greenslade, a vision in beige, so well mannered she hardly existed any more There are so many of them clamouring for our attention; if anything the book was too short to accommodate them all - expand it a bit and we would have had more time to enjoy the individual stories branching off the main 'trunk' of the story.

This said, everything was resolved with the help of some hectic head-hopping as the book headed for its conclusion A jolly good read, as always from Deborah Moggach. She writes the sort of lively character-based fiction that Kate Atkinson writes with such commercial success, and she has been doing it for years and years. View 2 comments. Jul 04, Cass rated it it was ok Shelves: A nice enough little story about about some elderly English living out their senility in India.

Gosh, even that sentence bores me. I don't want to be overly negative, it was an okay book. The first three-quarters of the book were setting the scene for a plot that lasted barely a dozen pages. The characters were lovely, lots of unexplained behaviors. Was this book written with a movie in mind?

I wouldn't read it agai A nice enough little story about about some elderly English living out their senility in India. I wouldn't read it again. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone. I wouldn't tell anyone not to read it either One of this kind of books. I am glad that finally after a very long time on mnt toobie - I have got around to reading this novel.

It is a real delight, and it I have discovered a writer I had not previously read. This is a funny and touching comedy of manners set in London and Bangalore, but it has many quite profound things to say really, about ageing, family, and lonliness, and about how important it is to feel a part of something, a family, a group, something to identify with.

There is a wonderful cast of characters - I am glad that finally after a very long time on mnt toobie - I have got around to reading this novel. There is a wonderful cast of characters - some of whom behave quite badly - but for whom the reader is allowed to feel quite a bit of sympathy. I must say if I could I would pack my bags now and head out to Dunroamin in Bagalore - even though I'm still a little too young it would do me the power of good I think,.

Dec 29, Melki rated it liked it Shelves: That story involved false accusations, bad behavior, and a whole lot of characters I wanted to punch. Everyone manages to mind their manners in this book, and many of the characters are genuinely likeable - even the ever-randy Norman Purse, who's been more than a wee bit frisky since his prostate operation. Norman's the guy who basically gets the ball rolling in this book when he moves in with his daugh The last book I read about Brits mixin' it up with the people of India was A Passage to India.

Norman's the guy who basically gets the ball rolling in this book when he moves in with his daughter and son-in-law, Ravi. Norman's annoying presence and slovenly habits drive Ravi to dream up a way to be rid of the old man, and the result is the Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, currently a run-down fleabag in India.

Ravi plans to turn it into a home away from home for the elderly of Britain. Soon the building is up and running, and filled with quirky and charming old folks. Expect warmhearted culture clashes, poignant moments and a few deft comic touches. There are many revelations, and crises aplenty, but the book never really manages to rise out of the category of pleasant diversion.

At least I didn't want to punch anyone. Goodreads win - ARC This novel was just what I needed a good laugh, not because I was miserable but the last novel I finished although excellent had very serious undertones. I needed a complete change of pace which this certainly supplied. Ravi Kapoor a doctor in London is fed up with his somewhat repulsive and difficult father-in-law whom is currently living with him and his wife Pauline.

He is living with them as he keeps getting thrown out of old peoples homes! No one wants him and Ravi wishes he was somewhere fa This novel was just what I needed a good laugh, not because I was miserable but the last novel I finished although excellent had very serious undertones.

When his cousin Sonny an entrepreneurial business man from Bangalore, India is in London on business he and Ravi come up with what they see as a brilliant plan. They set up a retirement home currently a run down guest house into a home for the more discerning customer.

We are gradually told the tales and secrets of the characters in classic Debroah Moggach style; somehow both funny and touching at the same time, the highs and lows of not just retiring to a residential home but one that is abroad. In fact most of these elderly residents seem to get a new lease of life by making this bold move and one even reads that one of them considers seventy to be the new forty. Now that is something to look forward too!

I thoroughly enjoyed this book - as usual, it went much more into each character's personality and back story than the movie did. I have visited Bangalore on business, but even before that, I have had a foreigner's infatuation with all things Indian. I think the readers who were offended by this book did not realize that the author was trying to portray the events through her elderly characters sonewhat ignorant and bigoted perspectives, not her own, and certainly did not assume the reader woul I thoroughly enjoyed this book - as usual, it went much more into each character's personality and back story than the movie did.

I think the readers who were offended by this book did not realize that the author was trying to portray the events through her elderly characters sonewhat ignorant and bigoted perspectives, not her own, and certainly did not assume the reader would agree with that way of thinking. Jun 10, Aditi rated it did not like it. Go directly to the movie. Do not stop to browse. Do not try a sample chapter. Do not even read the blurb on the back of the book. This was a quick and engaging read, in a captivating setting, but it really seemed like it contained far too many missed opportunities to Say Something.

I have a sneaking suspicion I'll like the movie better than the novel, which almost never happens. The book includes a number of closely intertwined story lines about a number of Britishers seeking to spend their final days in a relatively shoddy retirement home in Bangalore, India.

There are also some stories revolving around family members and This was a quick and engaging read, in a captivating setting, but it really seemed like it contained far too many missed opportunities to Say Something. There are also some stories revolving around family members and hotel employees, all with messed up lives and dysfunctional relationships.

A lucky few of these characters wind their way through the book and end up someplace better, with a possibility of a happily ever after if only for a couple of years or a potential to salvage a relationship or lifestyle. But some of the characters have a story line that roughly translates to "life sucks, and then you die. Not everyone gets a happy ending, after all. But still, I had to wonder why the author bothered with some of the characters at all.

I really liked Dorothy, the clever, retired woman from BBC who had grown up in Bangalore in some of the self-same places where the modern story takes place. But she's rather tragic throughout, and then she connects with her childhood, and then she dies.

It appears that this character doesn't even make it into the movie, which is probably a wise editing choice. And Norman? Annoying comic relief, perhaps, but never made happy nor redeemed in his story. Just killed off in a fairly cruel way, really.

The Internet Movie Script Database (IMSDb)

I had pretty strong mixed reactions to this book. Although I found the characters well-drawn, and I really loved the setting and the premise and I don't think I had any misconceptions about the subject matter when I embarked: The book felt a bit like an exercise of getting from Point A to Point A-and-a-half. And I tend to expect a good deal more than that from my books. View all 4 comments. If you read this expecting it to be like the movie, you will find that it is not.

Although I enjoyed the film, it was not this book. The names were not changed but the dynamics of the characters were all flopped around.

Highlights

I thought Norman, although disgusting, was an important focal point in the book. Douglas and Jean d If you read this expecting it to be like the movie, you will find that it is not. Douglas and Jean did not visit every temple and carving in India together, but rather Jean stayed in her room the entire time and Doug ventured out alone.

There was no Theresa and Keith encounter. Practically every thespian played a part counter to the novel's character. They performed some other also enjoyable movie, which I think was supposed to be about outsourcing the care of the elderly to India. As though everyone was tossed into the air and when they landed, they were scattered in a different pattern that still somehow fit. Oct 20, Danny rated it it was amazing. Without a doubt, this novel is a member of my top 5 favourite read stories of this year.

Where to even begin? Well, you can read the blurb to find out the plot, so i'll refrain from repeating it. This is perhaps one of the best examples since Roy's 'God of Small Things' of the complex Anglo-Indian relationship, post independence.

Review: 'The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel'

Deborah Moggach allows the reader to form a definite and firm opinion of each character due to the changing shift in language and style used when writing from each perspective. The style of the novel is very "British" in regards to some of the things that happens to the characters and how they react, or in fact, how the reader acts when "witnessing" these calamities. This isn't your conventional story; Moggach makes you laugh in the wrong places, gasp in shock and then smile, and completely refreshes your pallet for future stories.

All in all, I cannot recommend this novel enough. Jan 22, Kandice rated it it was ok. I am left at a loss for words.

Best Exotic Marigold Hotel Tour

I have no good words. I have no bad words. This book was very, very just so. Some of the characters showed promise, but none seemed to live up to that potential. I've been thinking about what to write for two days and the fact that I came up with nothing says a lot. Doesn't say anything good, but a lot none the less. Jun 10, Dale rated it really liked it. Having adored the movie, I was motivated to read the book.

I was suspicious when I learned the book had been re-titled to match the movie and re-marketed. Perhaps this is a case of a movie promoting a book. The 2 are very different. While the storyline is the same--outsourcing old age, the stories within are quite different. Being on the threshold of old-age, I understood the thoughts of the characters very well. Aged people from all walks of life, facing declining financial situations, wanderin Having adored the movie, I was motivated to read the book.

Aged people from all walks of life, facing declining financial situations, wandering offspring with their own lives and feelings of no longer having value. This book and the movie evoke emotions of a satisfying synthesis of humor and pathos. If there is humor in old people trying to find meaning in what is left of their lives while waiting for the axe to fall.

While the movie deals only with the lives of the old folks, the book brings in the equally complicated emotions of the children. It seems we all, no matter what age, wonder and worry if we have done our best, made a difference or really matter to other human beings.

We all long for some meaningful intimate contact with others. I found the book thought-provoking, if not conversation-provoking.

You will have to decide for yourself if it is worth reading or sharing. Feb 16, Jacquelynn Luben rated it liked it. Having seen the film a little while ago, I found that the book originally entitled These Foolish Things that it's based upon is somewhat different from the film, except that a group of elderly people decide to go to live in a retirement home in Bangalore, South India.

In the film, the main characters are played by very well-known actors and this helps to differentiate between them. With the book, I had to make notes when I was being introduced to this multitude of characters, so that when they Having seen the film a little while ago, I found that the book originally entitled These Foolish Things that it's based upon is somewhat different from the film, except that a group of elderly people decide to go to live in a retirement home in Bangalore, South India.

With the book, I had to make notes when I was being introduced to this multitude of characters, so that when they reappeared I could remind myself who they were. The book is not strong on plot; very little actually happens. The characters fall in or out of love, have good or bad relationships with their children; think about life and death, and the effect their childhood's had on them.

This is a book that's mainly about the characters and their relationships, and in fact, almost the first half of the book seems to be taken up with introductions, leaving not too much space for denouements.

This is a multi-viewpoint novel and Deborah Moggach is very skilled at getting inside the heads of her many characters. As someone who has been debating whether or not four or five viewpoints in a novel is too many, I'm impressed by the fact that Deborah Moggach has inhabited 14 or 15 of her characters, and she does this so well that you really feel you know them.

It also creates a bond, and enables you to find empathy for even the characters who would probably irritate in real life, notably, Norman, the dirty old man, and possibly Muriel. However, I think there is a problem in that it is difficult to care about quite so many characters.

Although the book was very readable, I did begin to wonder, after a while whether we needed yet another character's story; I felt this particularly when Evelyn's son Christopher took the stage, to very little purpose, I thought.

Deborah Moggach writes with plenty of humour and empathy on the subject of retirement and death, though I'm not sure it's a topic I want to be reminded about. Despite the criticism above, it was a good read with a satisfying conclusion and I would probably read more of her writing.

I would probably give it 3. I started reading this before watching the film and finished it after. Apart from a few character names and a general mashing together of sub-plots, the book and film were quite separate entities.

There were deeply sad tales of the diminishing lives of the various characters. The story brings together disparate characters as their lives intersect in old age.

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Some of the intersections seemed a little too contrived, but there were no Hollywood endings to be seen. While the film is funny, poignant and I started reading this before watching the film and finished it after. While the film is funny, poignant and eminently watchable, the book was filled with queasy moments. I still fail to understand why so many of these OAPs from Britain made the trip to the nursing home in India when they clearly despised and feared anyone with darker skin.

The premise was flimsy at best, and seemed a little cobbled-together for the purpose of getting the characters together in the setting. There are numerous uncomfortable references to the inferiority of Indians and Indian goods the sticky notes that don't stick, the bandaids that fall off, the shady swamis at the ashrams, the girl whose black hair is reminiscent of a labrador's coat.

The most unlikable character in the book who was quite different in the film was absolutely vile. The book opens with Dr Ravi Kapoor hatching the scheme to set up the retirement home in Bangalore, India primarily to rid himself of his noxious father-in-law.

The full extent of how repugnant his father-in-law is, isn't clear until the reader is exposed to his thoughts once in India. His untimely demise and the salacious circumstances surrounding it, were not mourned by me. I was relieved to see him gone. I hesitate perhaps out of politeness to call it a racist view of India and Indians, but it certainly does leave me feeling uneasy. The characters are definitely self-serving and largely unlikable. The one I did warm to, played a fairly small part and died summarily before there was any development, culminating in an unsatisfying ending.

I saw the trailer for the film version of this book at the cinema a couple of months ago and decided I would like to read the book first. It's not the sort of book I would normally read, so it's thanks to the film that I picked it up. The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is a story about an eclectic mix of British pensioners moving out to a retirement home in the Indian city of Bangalore.

A disenchanted doctor in a busy London hospital, Ravi is encouraged by his brother Sonny to invest money in opening I saw the trailer for the film version of this book at the cinema a couple of months ago and decided I would like to read the book first. A disenchanted doctor in a busy London hospital, Ravi is encouraged by his brother Sonny to invest money in opening up a retirement home for British pensioners in an old building just off the airport road in Bangalore, India.

Ravi's English wife, Pauline is persuaded it's good idea and they do there best to encourage Pauline's widowed Father, Norman to move out there as one of he first guests. What follows is a hilarious heart warming story of cultural differences, new found love, shared experiences and sadness. It made me laugh out loud, gasp and almost shed a tear. A wonderful read! Judi Dench Evelyn Greenslade Tom Wilkinson Graham Dashwood Patrick Pearson Graham's Colleague Hugh Dickson Judge James Rawlings Estate Agent Bill Nighy Hepatitis A Recommended for India.

Cholera Recommended for India. Tuberculosis Recommended for India. Ideally 3 months before travel.

Hepatitis B Recommended for India. Ideally 2 months before travel. Yellow fever Certificate of vaccination required if arriving from an area with a risk of yellow fever transmission for India.

Ideally 10 days before travel. Japanese B encephalitis Recommended for India. Ideally 1 month before travel.Afterwards, the name of book which was originally named "These foolish …more Because of the movie "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" which was shot in Had I not seen the film first, I might have abandoned the This book disappointed me. View all 3 comments. And I tend to expect a good deal more than that from my books. He circles the wagons, he shuts down. What a fun read. The first section of the book provides a series of realistic portrayals of the fears of elderly retired people facing rejection by the younger generation and also anticipating their gradual decline towards death.

The characters are definitely self-serving and largely unlikable.